Shocking: Reporting Factory Farm Abuses to be Considered "Act of Terrorism" If New Laws Pass

Three states are the latest states to introduce Ag-Gag laws and lawmakers in 10 other states introduced similar bills in 2011-2012.

How do you keep consumers in the dark about the horrors of factory farms? By making it an “act of terrorism” for anyone to investigate animal cruelty, food safety or environmental violations on the corporate-controlled farms that produce the bulk of our meat, eggs and dairy products.

And who better to write the Animal and Ecological Terrorism Act, designed to protect Big Ag and Big Energy, than the lawyers on the Energy, Environment and ... Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - Jan 26, 2013 - 11:44 PM PST
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Dwight Rousu - Jan 26, 2013 - 11:52 PM PST
Dwight Rousu
4.0
by Dwight Rousu - Jan. 27, 2013

ALEC’s sole purpose is to write model legislation that protects corporate profits. Industry then pushes state legislators to adapt the bills for their states and push them ... More »

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Chelsea Idzior
4.1
by Chelsea Idzior - Feb. 16, 2013

It gives support for what it is saying about the Ag-Gag laws and investigates and explains the cruel practices that these laws may protect. It was good that they provided links to other sources.

It was well-written and explained the Ag-Gag laws and how they may allow cruelty of animals to continue. There was a little bit of editorializing and opinions thrown into the story which is normally not acceptable in a news story. However, considering the nature of the story subject it would be hard to stay neutral considering abuse is obviously wrong. I thought there was a lot of evidence, however, they did not have sources listed which would have made the story more credible.

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Allie Tomason
3.3
by Allie Tomason - Feb. 16, 2013

There is a lot of supporting material linked to this article. It is a call-to-action against animal cruelty of farm animals--as noted by the links to various state petitions. Ideally, it would be more balanced, and a couple of links don't seem to make sense. However, it is academically informative. Appreciating that fact, it provides a platform for conscious thought and discussion of the issue.

Current animal cruelty laws should pertain to farm animals, raised for food, as they do for pets. It's disconcerting--to face the fact--that some people don't have a conscious rationale of that and that articles like this are needed.

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Ariel Achatz
3.7
by Ariel Achatz - Feb. 21, 2013

This is a very interesting topic that not many people know about. It is semi-controversial and I think it is very well written.

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charles Ibe
by charles Ibe - Jan. 30, 2013

no i don't think this is not a good journalism because of how reporting factory farm abuses one another which is considered as an act of terrorism . For examnple Ag-Gag laws passed 20 years ago were focused more on detrrring people from destroying property, or form either stealing animals or setting them free. This is not a good journalism because ALEC-inspired bills take direct aim at anyone who tries to expose horrific acts of animal cruelty, dangerous animal-handling practices that might lead to food safety issues, lor blatant disregard for environmental laws designed to protect waterways from animal waste runoff.

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