Binders full of Big Bird: The risk & benefits of reporting on memes

(Blog Post) Election-themed GIFs, hashtags, and macros now constitute serious news pegs on the campaign trail. As journalists chase down Google searches and trending hashtags, the trajectory of U.S. election coverage is unmoored from campaign headquarters and D.C. bureaus and placed into the hands of the loudest crowds and their swiftest microbloggers.

“The modern reporter, especially the embed, is constantly checking his smartphone, as is the aide,” ... Full Story »

Posted by Trisha Collopy
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Posted by: Posted by Trisha Collopy - Oct 25, 2012 - 5:28 AM PDT
Content Type: Blog Post
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Edited by: Trisha Collopy - Oct 25, 2012 - 5:55 AM PDT

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Sirajul Islam
4.2
by Sirajul Islam - Oct. 27, 2012

This blog by Amanda Hess on the Poynter institute’s website is one of the most important and intuitive pieces so far...The report is on the theme that has deep correlation in between politics and journalism, and about new frontiers of media. Good work! Enough links and references, and extremely reader-friendly!

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CM Dugan
4.1
by CM Dugan - Oct. 27, 2012

SUMMARY: A look at the pros on cons on reporting memes, which ones stay jokes, and what ones become part of the campaigns themselves. WHAT’S NEW: It’s about a fairly new form of way to look at how social media looks and campaigns. BALANCE: It feels balanced as it offers both sides of why they should or shouldn’t be reported on. TRANSPARENCY: This article provides tons of links, citations and information at the already confusing world of internet and memes in relation to politics.

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Trisha Collopy
5.0
by Trisha Collopy - Oct. 25, 2012

A strong analysis of why some of the smallest storylines have blown up in the last few weeks of this campaign.

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Andy Osterbauer
4.0
by Andy Osterbauer - Oct. 25, 2012

Summary: The article was about how the internet can shape people's viewpoints even when it might not be intending to. What's New: The idea of using memes as a way of reporting or as a different way of looking at journalism. Balance: This article didn't seem to be too balanced. It focused more on the Romney side of things, when his comment blew up and was seen negatively. Transparency: There were several quotes and live reports that made this article credible.

See Full Review » (19 answers)

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