Marriage fight divides state's Catholics

Those who oppose the proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage are organizing, putting them at odds with bishops.

Catholic voters have played pivotal roles in the outcome of gay marriage measures in other states and are expected to do the same in Minnesota, where they rank as the state's largest religious denomination with nearly 1.1 million followers.

But unlike evangelicals and other conservative religious groups who have played key roles in supporting anti-gay marriage measures in other states, Catholics appear less likely to vote as a bloc on issues like ... Full Story »

Posted by Trisha Collopy
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Posted by: Posted by Trisha Collopy - Oct 9, 2012 - 7:14 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Trisha Collopy - Oct 9, 2012 - 7:18 PM PDT

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Mitchell Zebro
2.3
by Mitchell Zebro - Oct. 14, 2012

I belive that this article is very one sided. They dont really give the reasons Catholics are separated. The article doesnt talk about why a person would take the side of voting yes instead of listening to the bishops and other Church leaders.

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Kayla Knoll
3.5
by Kayla Knoll - Oct. 15, 2012

I think that this was an interesting article to read to see how the Catholic religion is split on which side they should vote for either for the marriage amendment or against it. I think that after reading this I thought it was balanced. It had pretty equal amount of quotes on both sides of the issue. Although I did think it was a little bit biased because they focused more time on the anti-amendment group. To make this story better they should have spent equal time on both the anti-amendment group and the group that is for the amendment. I also thought it was good that they used more recent article cites in this article it makes the story more relevant and up to date.

Summary: The star tribune took the time to look at the Catholic religion and how they feel about same-sex marriage. What's New: The catholic community is split on what they should vote on the amendment, some are wanting to vote yes while others are wanting to vote no. Evangelicals are not having a problem with this divide. Balance: They story overall has 6 quotes. 1 comes from a catholic official, while the other 5 are coming from opponents and outside researchers. This article is ... More »

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Chelsea Mellor
3.3
by Chelsea Mellor - Oct. 15, 2012

For the most part, this article stayed factual. I mean, I was pretty ignorant of Catholic beliefs and opinions about the marriage amendment. I feel like it was adequately fair in presenting both sides of the argument. No matter what, this will always be a controversial topic, but I liked that this article was a fresh debate on the issue.

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Adebayo Taiwo
by Adebayo Taiwo - Oct. 12, 2012

Star Tribune is a trusted source.

See Full Review » (1 answer)

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