Not-So-Quick Fix: ADHD Behavioral Therapy May Be More Effective Than Drugs in Long Run

Before stimulant drugs such as Ritalin, Concerta and Adderall began their rise to popularity in the 1970s, treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) focused on behavioral therapy. But as concerns build over the mounting dosages and extended treatment periods that come with stimulant drugs, clinical researchers are revisiting behavioral therapy techniques. Whereas stimulant medications may help young patients focus and behave in the ... Full Story »

Posted by Matthew Copley - via Scientific American
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Posted by: Posted by Matthew Copley - May 15, 2012 - 7:33 AM PDT
Reviewed by: Matthew Copley (review)
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Matthew Copley
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by Matthew Copley - May. 21, 2012

New research suggests that new behavioral and cognitive therapies may be more useful than traditional ADHD medicines. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is proven to be more effective in the long run, and helps by teaching children how to deal with this disorder instead of just prescribing drugs to suppress them. The science behind this article is not too hard to grasp. It is mainly based off of research performed by a Psychologist at LSU and members of the science department at UC, Davis. The article is mainly a correlational study, showing how these two treatments of ADHD differ.

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