Whatever happened to carbon capture?

The process was patented back in the 1930s, and it is reckoned to be one of the most important technologies we have for tackling greenhouse gas emissions.

So you might well ask: "Whatever happened to carbon capture and storage (CCS)?"

The International Energy Agency (IEA) forecasts global energy demand increasing by at least one-third by 2035.

The majority of that increase will come from burning fossil fuels; and without ... Full Story »

Posted by Fabrice Florin - via NewsRack (Energy)
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Posted by: Posted by Fabrice Florin - May 12, 2012 - 7:24 PM PDT
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Fabrice Florin
3.5
by Fabrice Florin - May. 13, 2012
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William Hughes-Games
1.4
by William Hughes-Games - May. 16, 2012

Completely ignores the idiocy implicit in this technology

We already have carbon capture factories. They are called trees. Plant them in plantations, harvet the wood for long term high quality housing, commercial building and furniture and use the waste wood to produce green urea instead of fossil fuel. In the mean time look up Amory Lovins in one of the recent TED talks. He describes how profitable it would be for companies to wean themselves off fossil fuels. He hasn't even factored in externalities in his calculations.

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