Asia's highest mountains have lost no ice in past 10 years, study shows

The world's greatest snow-capped peaks, which run in a chain from the Himalayas to Tian Shan on the border of China and Kyrgyzstan, have lost no ice over the last decade, new research shows. The discovery has stunned scientists, who had believed that aro Full Story »

Posted by Walter Cox - via Memeorandum
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Posted by: Posted by Walter Cox - Feb 8, 2012 - 12:54 PM PST
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Fabrice Florin - Feb 12, 2012 - 12:33 PM PST
Fabrice Florin
3.8
by Fabrice Florin - Feb. 26, 2012

Informative article about a recent study by Prof John Wahr of the University of Colorado, which suggests that meltwater from Asia's peaks is much less than previously estimated. This report provides useful context to put this discovery in perspective, citing independent Bristol University glaciologist Prof Jonathan Bamber's observation that despite this recent findings, "projections for sea level rise by 2100 will not change by much." I would have liked to hear more independent perspectives, but overall found this article to be factual and helpful.

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Sirajul Islam
3.9
by Sirajul Islam - Feb. 15, 2012

Well, an enterprising story, and has journalistic merit. Regarding science, I hope that the next IPCC report will cover this drawing on all the research that has taken place since the last one and it will provide a sumary of the state of the art at that time.

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Walter Cox
4.0
by Walter Cox - Feb. 20, 2012

A well-rounded story that references hard satellite data to correct the common misperception that all of the world's glaciers are rapidly receding. This misperception is partially the result a 2009 United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report that mistakenly claimed Himalayan glaciers would disappear by 2035. Current methods of monitoring glacier melt have also improved--previous projections were based almost entirely on monitoring just a few low-altitude glaciers, which biased the estimate. Current observations are from the GRACE satellites, which directly measure ice loss, or gain, on all of the world's 200,000 glaciers.

Yet another story that demonstrates the difficulty of accurately monitoring factors that influence climate change. Rigorous adherence to hard scientific data will ensure that the reality of climate change is neither minimized nor exaggerated. A good example of exaggeration is the linked story, which is severely fact-challenged and which offers almost no context. What is the average reader to think?

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Dwight Rousu
4.4
by Dwight Rousu - Feb. 18, 2012

A horribly misleading subject line, but the guts of the article are pretty good once you get past what the editor apparently did to the title.

I seem to recall models calling for more precipitation and ice at high altitudes based on the extra moisture in the warmer air, which would indicate the models were correct. A related story which presents a more clear and present danger is the acidification of the oceans due to them absorbing carbon dioxide out of the polluted air. The food chain is being threatened.

“Our results and those of everyone else show we are losing a huge amount of water into the oceans every year,” said Prof John Wahr of the University of ... More »

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  • Meltdown: Earth Rapidly Losing Ice Cover - Olga Belogolova - NationalJournal.com

    Glaciers and ice caps outside of Greenland and Antarctica are losing nearly 150 billion tons of ice each year, contributing to an annual 0.4 millimeter rise in sea levels ...
    Posted by Walter Cox