The efficiency of markets and how protectionism leaves the poor behind

There is something magnificent about the way that modern, market-driven businesses get ever more efficient. How they are able to derive ever more from ever less.

Agriculture used to be a matter of ploughing the soil, dropping in the seeds and rotating the crops every season to get nitrogen back into the ground. Now entire farms are mapped according to alkalinity, fertility, moisture, sunlight, orientation. Tractors are linked via GPS to ensure ... Full Story »

Posted by Kaizar Campwala
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Subjects: U.S., Business
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Posted by: Posted by Kaizar Campwala - Jun 1, 2007 - 12:54 PM PDT
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Edited by: Kaizar Campwala - Jun 1, 2007 - 12:55 PM PDT

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Paul Keene
3.9
by Paul Keene - Oct. 1, 2008

Very interesting topic. I generally do not like market driven morality. I can certainly see that high tech control could jump start economies. However, when you bypass pay, benefits, and environmental issues for bottom line performance, only the fat cats win and everyone else loses. The author did a reasonable job of presenting both sides, but seems to have favored the fat cat perspective.

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Kaizar Campwala
3.5
by Kaizar Campwala - Oct. 1, 2008
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Sam Smith
5.0
by Sam Smith - Oct. 1, 2008

Gavin Chait (Whythawk) is a guy who gets his hands dirty working on development at the bottom of the food chain in South Africa. His analysis here is certainly informed by a fundamental libertarian streak, but it's an extremely pragmatic libertarianism that has seen failure up close and personal and that has realistic expectations for what success might look like. Even if you disagree with his conclusions here, you'll benefit from the value of his perspective.

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