Teaching Beyond the Test, to Make Room Again for Current Events

To Robert Barry, a senior at Farmington High School, it seems normal to have a war or two going on while you’re growing up. “Afghanistan started when we were in third grade,” he said. “We heard about it, but it’s in the background — we stopped noticing it.” Full Story »

Posted by Kristin Gorski - via New York Times (New York/Region), Google News (Iraq)
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Subjects: World, Politics, Education
Member Tags: education (k-12), iraq war (2003- ), afghanistan war (2001- ), chris doyle, tests and examinations, Connecticut
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Posted by: Posted by Kristin Gorski - May 22, 2011 - 8:22 PM PDT
Reviewed by: Kristin Gorski (review)
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Kristin Gorski - May 23, 2011 - 7:06 AM PDT
Kristin Gorski
3.7
by Kristin Gorski - May. 23, 2011

The reporter's use of students' points of view to frame this well-written and insightful piece. Could benefit from some additional context: how are other teens from across the U.S. viewing these two wars? What do they think about being taught to the test? Listening to student voices on these issues could guide us to solutions and improvements on these issues.

Current events should be taught in all grades from 7th grade and older. It can even be incorporated into the curriculum with younger students, but the subject matters and how they are discussed need to made developmentally appropriate for them.

Even the College Board, which makes so much money selling SAT and A.P. tests that it can pay its president, Gaston Caperton, $872,061 a year, has ... More »

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