Fukushima Reactors Are a "Ticking Time Bomb," Japanese Govt in Denial

radiation is continuing to leak out of the reactors. The situation is not stable at all. So, you’re looking at basically a ticking time bomb. It appears stable, but the slightest disturbance—a secondary earthquake, a pipe break, evacuation of the crew at Fukushima—could set off a full-scale meltdown at three nuclear power stations, far beyond what we saw at Chernobyl. Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - Apr 14, 2011 - 10:18 AM PDT
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Edited by: Walter Cox - Apr 15, 2011 - 10:23 AM PDT
Walter Cox
3.9
by Walter Cox - Apr. 20, 2011

As usual, Michio Kaku, perhaps the most plain-spoken nuclear physicist on earth, offers a clear and revealing description of the situation at Fukushima. At risk, according to Kaku, are three reactors that might each become "Chernobyls," with the overall risk far exceeding that of the failed 1986 Soviet reactor. Kaku is particularly critical of the Japanese response to the Fukushima disaster, and he advocates military takeover of the situation.

Even a casual study of the Chernobyl incident reveals distinct parallels with Fukushima. 1./ In both cases the governments that had jurisdiction over the reactors downplayed the danger, which put millions of people unnecessarily at risk. 2./ In both cases, governments around the world downplayed the risk, which made it difficult for people to respond appropriately. 3./ In both cases, the nuclear power industry took charge of damage control, continuing to insist that nuclear power ... More »

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Francis Lilly
3.9
by Francis Lilly - Apr. 17, 2011

Good journalism. Questions were no leading, rather open ended. Sourcing is limited because it is an interview, however the credentials of Dr. Kaku are brought forth in the interview to establish his credibility and "authority" to analyze the situation. I wish Ms Goodman would have asked about the spent fuel pools so I rated it incomplete. Flooding the pools to cool surely had overflow and spread of contamination.The interview was focused on the reactors only. The out-of-control car was an excellent analogy for simplification of the events, and the Faustian bargain analogy hit the nail on the head regarding future debate on the issue. Very enjoyable journalism

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Randy Morrow
3.9
by Randy Morrow - Apr. 17, 2011

I suggest that they be removed from leadership entirely and be put as consultants. An international team of top physicists and engineers should take over, with the ... More »

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