Where even cellphones aren't safe

In authoritarian regimes, sending emails and using Facebook can be dangerous for activists. The U.S. State Department seeks to train them to protect themselves online.

Mohammed Maskati's cellphone was his lifeline to fellow human rights activists in strife-torn Bahrain. So when his line went dead in mid-March, he checked with the local phone company. His account, they told him, had been canceled.

Even worse, Maskati said, he discovered that Bahraini authorities used records of his calls, plus texts and emails sent from his phone, as a secret road map to crack down on his network of pro-democracy ... Full Story »

Posted by Fabrice Florin - via Andy Carvin, Jeff Jarvis, Umair Haque, Ish Harshawat (t), Kristi Hancock (t), Donica Mensing (t), Malorie Jae Lucich (t)
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Posted by: Posted by Fabrice Florin - Apr 9, 2011 - 8:03 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
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Fabrice Florin
3.5
by Fabrice Florin - Apr. 10, 2011
See Full Review » (1 answer)
Dana Kobilinsky
3.4
by Dana Kobilinsky - Apr. 11, 2011

The article is filled with quotes from many different people. The lead is engaging and shows how an average person and human rights activist in Bahrain life is affected by what is going on there. The article also has a lot of good links to other articles and information. A suggestion would be to add some of the tweets and facebook statuses that were discouraged in Bahrain.

See Full Review » (10 answers)
Elizabeth Hardisty
3.9
by Elizabeth Hardisty - Apr. 10, 2011

I thought this was a great article. It had a lot of extremely good information that related to the article in every way. Every piece of imformation was thoroughly cited; which made the article very credible. The article relates to society today and how technology is becoming more advanced; which results is a relevant article.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Isobel Kuchinsky
4.0
by Isobel Kuchinsky - Apr. 10, 2011

This piece was a good representation of good journalism because it was very in depth and offered details that answered questions I would have raised by the end of the article. I was not left wondering anything or doubting the facts that were given which is a good sign.

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Anna Westendorf
3.9
by Anna Westendorf - Apr. 11, 2011

I generally recommend this piece because it's not only a unique article, but also is very relevant, considering the ongoing use of new media and social networking overseas. I would have liked to hear more first-person accounts (such as Maskati's) in the piece, but also recognize the difficulties in attaining them.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Moupia Das
3.5
by Moupia Das - Apr. 10, 2011

This article is very informative and relevant to the various forms of social networks available on the internet and its importance in society. This takes an international perspective and views the limitations placed on various freedoms when it comes to expression. Whereas people often feel comfort in expressing their views online, in certain societies this can be dangerous. The writer takes both an up close and a general look at the issue, as well as, reactions of other societies.

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Jacqueline Gucker
3.6
by Jacqueline Gucker - Apr. 15, 2011

The article has a good amount of sources to back up the argument. I think that the writer could have done more research to talk about what kind of programs are being used to stop the corrupt governments. This article has an interesting topic, but the way it was written did not hold my attention.

See Full Review » (11 answers)

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from 10 reviews (34% confidence)
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