U.S. Jobless Claims Fall More Than Forecast

Economic data released Thursday provided the latest signs that the economy was recovering in fits and starts. Full Story »

Posted by Jon Mitchell - via David Wardell (t), John Rueschenberg (t), miker1717 (t), urmi das (t), Jeremy Caplan (t), Patrick McDermott (t), Kristi Hancock (t), Salvador Sala (t), Jaimey Perham (t)
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Posted by: Posted by Jon Mitchell - Jan 20, 2011 - 6:04 AM PST
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Jan 20, 2011 - 8:09 AM PST

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Jon Mitchell
2.9
by Jon Mitchell - Jan. 20, 2011

Broad summary of data showing some apparently positive trends, as well as others that are more ambivalent.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Sirajul Islam
3.9
by Sirajul Islam - Jan. 21, 2011

This report shows context and provides data and graph from The Labour Department (via Bloomberg) and The Conference Board. While the report says the American economy is growing, at the same time it said that the total number of Americans on benefit rolls rose to 9.6 million in the week ended Jan 1 from 9.2 million the previous week. However the report quoting the National Association of Realtors said in the housing market, the sale of existing homes rose 12.3 percent in December.

See Full Review » (19 answers)
Patrick McGuire
3.7
by Patrick McGuire - Jan. 20, 2011

As with any economic news lately, it is hard to know what is really going on. There always good news with scattered amounts of slow growth. It is time for economists to state the obvious and that unemployment will continue at their high levels for 2 - 3 years.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Ben Waldron
3.5
by Ben Waldron - Jan. 20, 2011

The evidence used in this article does not exactly convince one that the job market is steadily improving. The author acknowledges this, and essentially presents different versions of the same figures over and over. While it may be a simple rehashing of recently released statistics, the article is structured awkwardly. The housing market is mentioned early, then disappears, and then reappears without the aid of a transition.

See Full Review » (6 answers)

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