U.S. Government Seizes 82 Websites: A Glimpse at the Draconian Future of Copyright Enforcement?

Over the past few days, the U.S. Justice Department, the Department of Homeland Security and nine U.S. Attorneys’ Offices seized 82 domain names of websites they claim were engaged in the sale and distribution of counterfeit goods and illegal copyrighted works. Full Story »

Posted by Joey Baker - via Thanh Tran (f)
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# Tweets: 91 (as of 2010-11-30)
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Posted by: Posted by Joey Baker - Nov 30, 2010 - 6:40 AM PST
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Joey Baker - Nov 30, 2010 - 6:41 AM PST

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Jon Mitchell
4.0
by Jon Mitchell - Nov. 30, 2010

Upsetting report about the bold and extremely naïve new efforts by the U.S. government to stop copyright infringement by seizing domain names. It explains the tactics in detail, and it demonstrates how they won't work.

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Ian Sargent
3.3
by Ian Sargent - Dec. 6, 2010

This story is laden with bias and should be considered an opinion article. It highlights important issues regarding free speech and copyright infringement, but fails to give voice to both sides of the argument.

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Joey Baker
4.0
by Joey Baker - Nov. 30, 2010
See Full Review » (12 answers)
paul steinmiller
3.8
by paul steinmiller - Dec. 7, 2010

Doesn't the Department of homeland security have something better to do than prey and people file sharing and viewing copyrighted materials online? This truly seems like a waste of time on the behalf of our government knowing that the internet is every expanding and everyone that has seen the things are are being seized can repost them and many have. Additionally when it comes down to enforcing the copyright laws more people have the file than are know so how do you truly enforce the law without finding all who have the file or information illegally because as long as one person has the file to share it will spread and find itself online again.

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Caroline Halliwell
3.6
by Caroline Halliwell - Dec. 1, 2010

I do not believe this is good journalism because the slant of this website does not lend itself to credibility as it is not impartial in its reporting. Copyright infringement is against the law, whether this site makes excuses for the OnSmash.com that it mentioned or not. I did check the site, and it is, in fact, siezed by the U.S. Government. My concern is the statement on the EEF "According to the owners, they regularly and expeditiously process copyright infringement notices and take down links as appropriate.", with no real reference..otherwise yes I agree with you Joey

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    (Blog Post) Following on the heels of this week’s domain seizure of a large hiphop file-sharing links forum, it’s clear today that the U.S. Government has been very busy. Without any ...
    Posted by Jon Mitchell