“A Moment in the Sun”: An Extended Interview with Independent Filmmaker, Author John Sayles

(Multimedia) “However small your audiences, however frustrating it is to get where your version of the world or what you want to talk about out there, it is part of the conversation. If you shut up, the conversation is one-sided,” says Sayles. Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu - via David K. Miller (t), Seth Roberts Farber (t), Margot Palmer (t), Umbreen Bhatti (t), Jon Mitchell (t), Saed Abu Hmud (t), Joey Baker (t), Patrick McDermott (t), Steven K Samra (f), Fabrice Florin (f), avivao (f), Tobie Openshaw (f), Seth Roberts Farber (f), David K. Miller (f), Peter Avalos (f), Gian Antelles (f)
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - May 4, 2009 - 11:05 PM PDT
Content Type: Multimedia
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Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Jun 21, 2011 - 7:49 AM PDT
Beth Wellington
4.4
by Beth Wellington - Jun. 21, 2011

I like how Democracy Now provides both a video and the transcript. Sayles is a thought-provoking filmmaker (who also has authored several books.) Goodman takes an hour to let him cover a wide range of topics in depth. The emphasis is on his recent book a Moment in the Sun and on his upcoming film (due in August) Amigo, which is set in the Philippines during the U.S. occupation. There is also a clip from his film Matewan, which deals with the attempts to establish a union and led up to the War on Blair Mountain--Sayles tells of the current import and how some in WV are fighting to save the historic site from mountaintop removal coal mining.

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Dwight Rousu
4.9
by Dwight Rousu - Jun. 17, 2011

This interview splendidly covers history, including the rewriting of history by omission, human rights in many settings, racism in several settings, labor history, entertainment, and journalism. This is one of the best interviews I have seen recently.

I grew up never reading about the Philippine-American War, all the way through high school and college. I went through "training" for the Peace Corp preparing to go to the Philippines, and never fully heard the history of US atrocities in that war. I have been progressively more outraged over the years at being duped by re-writers of history as I see this pattern repeated in other settings. Sayles here is correctly seen as a truth-teller speaking truth in the face of history ... More »

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