Second Thoughts: The 'most transparent administration in history' buries a Gitmo report.

The report was not, in fact, released within the next few days. On February 2, Commander Jeffrey Gordon, the Pentagon spokesman who handles inquiries about Guantánamo, told us that the report would likely be released later that day. We were told to consult the website--defenselink.mil--that afternoon. No report. When we asked where it was, Commander Gordon wrote: "Nothing today, please check back with me in a couple days." We did. No report. Full Story »

Posted by Derek Hawkins
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Posted by: Posted by Derek Hawkins - Mar 9, 2009 - 12:35 AM PDT
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Edited by: Derek Hawkins - Mar 9, 2009 - 12:35 AM PDT

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Dwight Rousu
3.3
by Dwight Rousu - Mar. 9, 2009

The report highlights promised release of data that has not been released. While that seems valid, the question is not addressed of whether the promise should have included all the information.

If these people are released and go join terrorist groups, is that because they were terrorists before, or because being disrespected and tortured turned them into terrorists? One can presume their incarceration was not designed to prevent recidivism when they were released.

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Kenneth Sibbett
3.5
by Kenneth Sibbett - Mar. 9, 2009

The authors make a great point. what do you do with the released prisoners? What do we do with the prisoners we release? We let them go. Over 50% go back. In the U. S. it's like a revolving door. Or we supposed to keep the prisoners in Gitmo until they are so old they need wheelchairs. Believe or not, a man in a wheelchair still has his mind. He could still plan terrorists acts. He may not participate, but what's the difference.

I agree with the transparency issue. We need to know when they are released and where they are, and as much as we can,what they are doing.

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Ian Cerveny
3.3
by Ian Cerveny - Mar. 10, 2009

That minor report was buried does not spell the death of a campaign promise, but it is certainly a step in that direction.

If these detainees were legally obtained prisoners of war, there would have been no difficulty prosecuting them. The Obama Administration knew they could not successfully prosecute those released, and had no choice but to let them go. The methods of the previous administration created an impossible situation. Still, transparency is clearly not a concern for the new admin.

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Derek Hawkins
3.0
by Derek Hawkins - Mar. 9, 2009
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Peter L. Combs
4.0
by Peter L. Combs - Mar. 9, 2009

Good story, good facts...

Wake up America...did these nit wits REALLY think Gitmo was packed with innocents? Bottom of the barrel for the most part..

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Ron Pulcini
2.0
by Ron Pulcini - Mar. 9, 2009

Does the ad for Fox News on the Weekly Standard's home page offer any indication of its bias? Doh? I rest my case.

Billy Joel put it best: "We didn't light the fire…"

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Junaid Kalia
3.9
by Junaid Kalia - Mar. 9, 2009

The Personal has clearly researched; and presented well. Especially the hollow rhetoric of obama campain is clearly being evident.

What happens to a person's ideology; when he is in tremoundous beurocratic pressure. One of many to come I should make a folder named "Hollow rhetoric of obama campain "

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