The new D.C.: Same as it ever was

So much for post-partisanship.

Not a single House Republican crossed the aisle to vote for the stimulus package, and just three GOP senators made the leap. Last week, Speaker Nancy Pelosi brushed off calls for a bipartisan consensus as mere “process,” hardly relevant to the passage of the $800 billion-plus plan.

Democrats are carpet-bombing the districts of vulnerable Republicans with negative ads. At noon Wednesday, Republican ... Full Story »

Posted by Dale Penn
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Posted by: Posted by Dale Penn - Feb 12, 2009 - 10:05 AM PST
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Edited by: Dale Penn - Feb 12, 2009 - 10:05 AM PST

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Jack Dinkmeyer
1.8
by Jack Dinkmeyer - Feb. 12, 2009

A don't-bother piece of so-what journalism. Polarization is remain a strong part of government as long as the only Republicans left are radical right-wingers for whom polarization is a way of life. Long ago they threw moderates out of the party with "either you're with us or against us."

Forget bipartisanship. It’s a waste of Democrats’ time. Republicans consider Democrats who practice it weak and ineffectual. Republicans have proven themselves utterly incompetent at governance but flawless experts at obfuscation, distortions, deceit, and impediment.

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Dale Penn
3.0
by Dale Penn - Feb. 12, 2009

This report is pretty flat. For instance, it seems to lay blame on the Republicans by stating "Not a single House Republican crossed the aisle to vote for the stimulus package, and just three GOP senators made the leap." Yet I don't see any mention of how many Democrats voted against the bill. I rated it low on context as it fails to mention that this is only three weeks into Obama's term, so to expect bi-partisanship to take root and bloom in that length of time seems totally irrational to me.

I recommend this story quite a bit, despite its flaws, as it shows how far we have to go if Obama's vision of bi-partisanship is to be even partially realized.

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James Staley
3.5
by James Staley - Feb. 12, 2009

This is a good journalistic piece, nicely presenting the essential, differing views of the still partisan parties. Though the authors could have quoted more members from both parties, they convincingly made their point: politics on the Hill is still rabidly partisan, except for Obama's bipartisan overtures.

The Republicans are like lemmings rushing toward the sea, squawking the old "give most to the richest individuals and businesses" -- even tax subsidies to send our businesses overseas (Rep. Mike Pence, Indiana) -- and moan about directly helping so much the vast majority of Americans. These are the same disastrous ideas that got us into this economic meltdown. They have put themselves in the position of uniformly hoping our crisis turns into a full-fledged depression; otherwise, they ... More »

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Kenneth Sibbett
3.1
by Kenneth Sibbett - Feb. 12, 2009

It seems to me that it was both sides that played the same old tired politics. When all 170 members of the Republican side voted against the bill, with not even 1 member thinking the bill might be a good idea, then you can see who was lock-stepping.

Now that this huge bill is passed, maybe,just maybe, the anger and bi-partisanship will be gone. But I don't see it ever changing as long as the lobbyist's run D.C.

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