Finland's educational system offers lessons for Dallas

By the time Finland's children complete the ninth grade, they speak three languages. They have studied algebra, geometry and statistics since the first grade. And they beat the pants off students from just about everywhere else in the world.

In math, science, problem solving and reading comprehension, Finland's 15-year-olds came out at or near the top in international tests given in 2000, 2003 and 2006. Even the least among Finnish students – ... Full Story »

Posted by Dale Penn
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Subjects: Education
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Posted by: Posted by Dale Penn - Feb 7, 2009 - 10:02 PM PST
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Edited by: Dale Penn - Feb 7, 2009 - 10:02 PM PST
Patricia Blochowiak
3.3
by Patricia Blochowiak - Feb. 9, 2009

Could do with more background, such as what is the national percentage of minorities, such as the Suomi (?sp) & immigrants. Also needs more links and specific references. Still, in this day of more & more practice tests to prepare for the formal tests, more & more test preparation, & less attention to problem-solving skills & subjects other than reading, writing, & math, it's refreshing to hear about problem-solving skills.

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Kaizar Campwala
4.1
by Kaizar Campwala - Feb. 9, 2009

A fascinating look at the evolution of the Finnish education system, and how some of the ideas cultivated there could be transplanted to Dallas.

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Joel Kulenkamp
4.5
by Joel Kulenkamp - Feb. 9, 2009

This gives a nice comprehensive look at Finland's education system--warts and all--and how the US should (and SHOULDN'T) emulate such.

I would think it would also offer lessons--no pun intended--for the rest of the USA as well.

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Patricia L'Herrou
3.7
by Patricia L'Herrou - Feb. 9, 2009

there's information here about history of finland and its schools implied then is that idea that many of these may be helpful in making changes in systems here. reasonably there are elements that could be modeled after elements there. altho some possibly vital differences between the countries, both educationally and culturally are mentioned, how those could factor into education systems here is not.

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Peter L. Combs
3.6
by Peter L. Combs - Feb. 9, 2009

A well written article with good sources on Finland's Ed. system and history. No mention was made however of the extreme differences in how Finnish Schools are financed and their Mandatory Voc. Ed programs for those with lower grades. The article fell short on balance between the US and Finland's system. Well worth the read just the same.

In Finland, students are held accountable for low grades and poor performance, teachers MUST have a Masters. Kids with poor grades head into VOC Education starting in the 9th Grade, not many entitled Americans would like this system. As an aside: The unemployement rate is over 8%, Food VAT is 17%, Income Taxes run about 30%.

While “the U.S. holds teachers accountable for teaching” in Finland “they hold the students accountable for learning.” More »

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Peter Henry
4.4
by Peter Henry - Feb. 9, 2009

Interesting article which examines a national success story. A fascinating piece deals with national education reform that * actually worked * - I am hungry for more details. No serious analysis of how to use the lessons of Finland in the U.S.

Finland's education system is among the best in the world. One possible reason that this could happen there, if not here (not even touched on in the article) is Finland is a socialist, egalitarian society where even the poor aren't desperate. Schools there don't have to take care of the amazing dysfunctional social problems of dislocated kids and families we have here in large numbers. Education is only part of the solution.

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Dale Penn
4.0
by Dale Penn - Feb. 7, 2009

Offers some insight into the differences bertween Finland and Dallas.

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Norman Rogers
2.9
by Norman Rogers - Feb. 8, 2009

It's difficult to know what is going on in Finland from this story. There is a tendency to turn the Finish experience into evidence for "reforms" desired by the education establishment here. For example higher status and salaries for teachers which wouldn't change anything except to give teachers more expensive houses and cars.

We have now a 100 year history of school reform that never seems to reform anything. The teachers have shown that you can fool everyone all the time.

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Harold E. Taylor
5.0
by Harold E. Taylor - Feb. 9, 2009

1- tells Truth that other MSM will ignore 2- who, what, when, where, why & how all answered 3- problem & unique solution

I blog myself. I'm republishing your article with my own comments added: Dallas, TX, Sends Its Kids To Finland's Schools - Well, Sort Of! Finnish Kids Speak 3 Languages, Study Algebra, Geometry & Statistics Since 1st Grade, Leave Other Countries' Students In Dust! - RI10 (Excerpt: Democracies want undereducated electorates, which believe politicians' lies & half-truths. But not in Dallas! They follow the Finnish model; in Finland, even the lowest 10 percent beat their peers ... More »

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