Deepwater drilling: risks and consequences

What if, as in Hungary's red sludge disaster, oil executives faced possible prosecution for spills that result in loss of life? Full Story »

Posted by Barry Grossheim - via The Guardian (US), AllTop, Gian Antelles (f)
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Posted by: Posted by Barry Grossheim - Oct 13, 2010 - 7:55 AM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Beth Wellington - Nov 27, 2010 - 1:27 PM PST
Jack Dinkmeyer
3.9
by Jack Dinkmeyer - Oct. 24, 2010

An excellently constructed article which uses links and quotes to make its basic point: that BP and the government blocked access, diverted attention, and minimized reporting of the actual damage and consequent long-term effects. Obviously–like the aftermath of the Bush administration atrocities–no arrests shall be made. No one shall be held accountable. No one shall have to answer for the results of doing everything on the cheap. No one shall have to respond why government is now of and for big business and special interests. No one shall have to shoulder responsibility. No one shall have to justify why democracy is being replaced by fiscal fascism. Life and government continue on their distorted ways as if nothing ... More »

What is being gracefully ignored is the oil industry’s ironclad grip on the world. The truth is that no government anywhere dare take meaningful action against the oil cartel. It’s all right to slap wrists now and then, as in the drilling moratorium, but the world is desperately addicted to oil and really cannot afford to indulge in any meaningful confrontation or imposition of effective controls. It’s not the first instance of Big Oil working both sides of the street. ... More »

See Full Review » (19 answers)
Betsy Taylor
4.8
by Betsy Taylor - Oct. 14, 2010

This piece does exactly what an 'opinion' piece should do. It digs beneath the mere facts, to ask basic questions about causation, policy, society. She then pursues those questions logically and factually. Using two environmentally similar disasters (both toxic spills affecting water commons) she then compares different judicial & political responses based on different national legal & political structures. This gives her a chance to ask the question: which is better? Which is a question of immense societal significance. To give background on environmental & health impacts, she brings in experts with a good track record -- both in terms of accuracy of data & independent advocacy for public welfare.

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Barry Grossheim
4.0
by Barry Grossheim - Oct. 13, 2010

Asks the question why aren't BP executives being prosecuted for the Gulf Oil Spill disaster. Insightful and well written.

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Randy Morrow
3.5
by Randy Morrow - Oct. 14, 2010

Salazar’s decision to lift the moratorium is yet another mistake…the real crux is that the agency that is supposed to be overseeing oil drilling has completely ... More »

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Veronica Garcia
2.8
by Veronica Garcia - Oct. 14, 2010

The author of this article shows her opinion a lot in this piece, using the word I in her writing. Because it shows so much of her opinion I can only conclude that this piece is probably very slanted towards her views. She backs up her opinion with lots of facts and quotes and sheds little light on the opposing sides argument. I think the fact that it is more of an opinion piece makes this article a little less credible.

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Rebecca Solomon
4.0
by Rebecca Solomon - Oct. 13, 2010

This article accurately and ethically addresses the familiar stereotype that Americans don't care about environmental issues. The fact that our government is taking higher measures to stop the negative effects of deepwater drilling defies that tired notion and efficiently dispels all thought of an unreliable and anti-green nation. While there are still measures to be taken, this article valiantly and effectively seeks to eliminate stereotypes through accurate information and persuasive points.

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David Rothman
4.5
by David Rothman - Oct. 14, 2010

Beth is a poet here and in life. I like her vivid, concrete language ("marshlands and wildlife coated in crude oil") mixed with more abstract facts (for example, the information on the Obama Administration's backtracking). She showed the same virtues in the mountaintop removal piece she also wrote for the Guardian. Above all, I like the importance of the issues she raises--we should hold corporate malefactors criminally responsible. Beth's use of the Hungarian example strengthens her case (even though the judge dismissed the demands that a specific executive be linked to the red sludge spill). It drew me nicely into the article. This is an opinion essay without the need for full balance. Just the same, I would have ... More »

As made clear elsewhere, I would agree with Beth Wellington's take on the issue.

We’ve mourned the deaths, the idled fishermen and oil rig roughnecks, the marshlands and wildlife coated in crude oil, the estimated 185m gallons of oil dumped, ... More »

Disclosure: David is involved in this story as a friend (review not included in overall rating). Help
See Full Review » (13 answers)

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