Judge Orders U.S. Military to Stop ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered the United States military to stop enforcing the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law that prohibits openly gay men and women from serving. Full Story »

Posted by Samuel W. Velsor IV - via Google News (U.S.), Ish Harshawat (t), Steven K Samra (f), Rachel Fus (f), Alex Williams (f), JR Russ (f), David Fox (f), Jon Mitchell (f)
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Posted by: Posted by Samuel W. Velsor IV - Oct 12, 2010 - 5:51 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Oct 13, 2010 - 8:01 AM PDT
Jon Mitchell
3.9
by Jon Mitchell - Oct. 13, 2010

Good report on the order to stop "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," including the recent legal proceedings that led to this ruling, as well as a deeper history of the policy and it's impacts.

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Ann AA
4.0
by Ann AA - Oct. 13, 2010

Let them serve! They are human beings just like you and I. They have the right to be free with who they want to be. I am so sick of reading about this and other stories that involve the gay community in a negative way . They have the right to be who they wish to be and if they want to do something amazing like serving to protect this country; well then let them. They live here too and have as much rights as any other American.

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Jennifer Savage
4.2
by Jennifer Savage - Oct. 14, 2010

The "Don't Ask Don't Tell" law, activates stereotypes and encourages discrimination. The law prohibited military officials from asking a recruit's sexual orientation, but threatened to release soldiers whose homosexual orientation was exposed. What stereotypical expectations did the military hold about a homosexual person's behavior in the military? And, while Judge Phillips issued injunction against the law, the author writes that "the government is expected to appeal the injunction to the Court of Appeals...". Although she didn't state any evidence to that effect, she may have had evidence that suggested it. One could question however, whether that statement was derived from information that she received or her own ... More »

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Veronica Garcia
5.0
by Veronica Garcia - Oct. 13, 2010

I think the author's article was very professionally written. He remains completely unbiased by sharing background information, facts, and quotes equally for both sides of the argument. The only thing I feel the author could have done better would be to include more direct quotes from homosexuals, not just the organizations that represent them. I feel the quotes from those affected would have been much more powerful. Quotes from the opposing side of the argument, for example from the ex-marine, were more powerful because they were from those directly involved with the debate. The article itself goes a long way toward destroying people's stereotypes about gays being high maintenance. It seems obvious that the 14 thousand ... More »

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Samuel W.  Velsor IV
4.1
by Samuel W. Velsor IV - Oct. 13, 2010

If Obama were smart, he’d let it stay and not cow tow to the DOD; in turn win full support of the gay voter. He promised to get rid of DADT in quick order and has not, the no vote in the Senate is indeed his fault as he allowed again to cow tow to the DOD and did not let it be voted quickly after his State of the Union Speech. DOD wanted its very bias survey to be run before anything else and Obama who on paper is CIC caved here too. He has his chance now to show his true ... More »

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Anna Lee Esquibel
4.4
by Anna Lee Esquibel - Oct. 15, 2010

This article is about the "don't ask, don't tell" law that states members of the military cannot be openly gay or lesbian. A judge has overturned this law and deemed it unconstitutional. This article does a good job of not employing stereotypes but there are some parts that respond to stereotypes regarding the issue. In a way the article assumes that all members of the military are gay and it does not address the repercussions of this decision to straight members of the military. It also fails to recognize that there are members of the military that are gay, just not openly so. So the unknowledgeable reader would assume that there are no homosexuals in the military while this is not the case. The article does do a good job of ... More »

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Ashley Larm
4.0
by Ashley Larm - Oct. 15, 2010

I thought this story was great. It was written in a very professional manner but it was also so approachable that you just wanted to finish it. It is very relevant and on a topic that is really effecting the US right now. We are in a time of advancement for gay rights and this article does a great job with covering all who are involved from the president, to the other members of the government, and even to the common people that may not be for this measure. It was very fair and informative and did a great job with varying the way that it was written enough to keep the reader interested. I would highly recommend it to anyone that is interested in the topic.

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