Judge Orders U.S. Military to Stop ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered the United States military to stop enforcing the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law that prohibits openly gay men and women from serving. Full Story »

Posted by Samuel W. Velsor IV - via Google News (U.S.), Ish Harshawat (t), Rachel Fus (f), JR Russ (f), Jon Mitchell (f), Steven K Samra (f), David Fox (f), Alex Williams (f)

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Review

Veronica Garcia
5.0
by Veronica Garcia - Oct. 13, 2010

I think the author's article was very professionally written. He remains completely unbiased by sharing background information, facts, and quotes equally for both sides of the argument. The only thing I feel the author could have done better would be to include more direct quotes from homosexuals, not just the organizations that represent them. I feel the quotes from those affected would have been much more powerful. Quotes from the opposing side of the argument, for example from the ex-marine, were more powerful because they were from those directly involved with the debate. The article itself goes a long way toward destroying people's stereotypes about gays being high maintenance. It seems obvious that the 14 thousand soldiers who were discharged because they came out as gay, went into this vocation because they believed in what the army represents. They didn't ask for any special treatment or allowances because of their sexual preference. They only wanted to serve their country like any other soldier. Overall I feel the author handled this article very well given such a touchy topic.

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Veronica's Rating

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5.0

Very good
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