Ireland faces up to spectre of double-dip recession

As the spectre of a double-dip recession looms over the republic even areas close to the heart of the Irish capital are starting again to resemble the recession-ravaged 1980s. Full Story »

Posted by Peter Ford - via NewsRack (Recession), Google News (Business), NewsRack (Business), Thanh Tran (t), Thanh Tran (f)
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Posted by: Posted by Peter Ford - Sep 25, 2010 - 6:04 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Sep 26, 2010 - 10:25 AM PDT
Jon Mitchell
3.7
by Jon Mitchell - Sep. 26, 2010

This story is well-written, and the context is there. It gives a good sense of the expert and official attitudes in response to the deepening crisis.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Chris Finnie
2.8
by Chris Finnie - Sep. 26, 2010

From other reports I've read, this appears to be a good snapshot of the current Irish economy. But it does little to explain how it got there--other than the oblique reference to the inflated spending during the Celtic Tiger years. I'm sure that's true. But it's hardly the whole story. Much of this spending was financed by EU funds, to judge by roadside signs saying so. Other spending was financed by the expansion of U.S. and multinational firms locating European headquarters in Ireland. Something several guides mentioned during my visits there. I also noted a huge rise in costs over several trips there--primarily after their adoption of the Euro currency. The author does not take note of any of this. Nor of the IMF pressure ... More »

On the bright side, economists including Mike Smyth at the University of Ulster believe the republic’s brutal cost-cutting programmes have been ... More »

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Peter Ford
3.8
by Peter Ford - Sep. 26, 2010
See Full Review » (3 answers)
Randy Morrow
3.6
by Randy Morrow - Sep. 27, 2010

“Why, for example, would investors seek to put their money into a deflationary economy? We have taken something like 6% of Irish GDP out of ... More »

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Danielle Christenson
3.4
by Danielle Christenson - Sep. 26, 2010

Considering if this is good journalism, I look at if the writer wrote the story with factual evidence, trustable sources, and deep insight. This story is an example of so-so good journalism. Yes, the writer gives us factual evidence but what he or she lacks is sources, trustworthy sources. The writer makes statements such as, " Prime minister Brian Cowen's Fianna Fail/Green party coalition has tried to instil global faith in the Irish economy by slashing public spending." How do we know this quote is true? Where is the source to back up the given information? In some of the story I see where the evidence has sources but it should be sources continuously throughout the entire story. The last part of good journalism that I judge ... More »

I visited Ireland this past summer, while I took a tour throughout the countryside the tour guide told my mother and I about the state of his country. He said Ireland is always seeing a recession, and many people are losing their jobs from foreign immigrants. I thought this was interesting because in America we have the same issue, but not to the extent of Ireland's.

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Kalina Potts
3.3
by Kalina Potts - Sep. 27, 2010

The story is very informative, but lacks basic statistics to back it up. I would like to see more than what was provided.

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