Playing the health insurance gamble

A growing number of small business owners and full-time workers make up about 80 percent of America's 46 million people without health insurance. The number of people without such insurance increased 11.2 percent from 2001 to 2004. Full Story »

Posted by Peggy Kruse
Tags Help
Subjects: U.S., Politics, Business, Health
Topics: Health Care
Member Tags: health insurance coverage, uninsured workers, uninsured, middle class, working families, small businesses, business owners, hospitals, Texas, Health Industry, Medical costs
Stats Help
Number sourcesHelp: 10+
Anonymous sourcesHelp: 0
Number viewpointsHelp: 4
Opinions as factsHelp: 0
Number stakeholdersHelp: 4
Stakeholders quotedHelp: 5
Derogatory wordsHelp: 0
Editorial Help
Posted by: Posted by Peggy Kruse - May 8, 2006 - 4:15 PM PDT
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Peggy Kruse - May 8, 2006 - 4:25 PM PDT

Reviews

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Fabrice Florin
3.7
by Fabrice Florin - Oct. 1, 2008

Informative report about an important topic. A bit dry though, and does not provide sources for some key facts.

See Full Review » (12 answers)
Peggy Kruse
4.1
by Peggy Kruse - Oct. 1, 2008

This article from the Austin Business Journal article is on the MSNBC web site. The overall U.S. data has appeared recently in many local newspapers, but this article provides much more data and includes views of those who work with the uninsured and with health care in the Austin area. No counter-opinions are given, but I'm not sure how many experts believe it is a good thing that so many Americans are uninsured...or at least would admit they do.

See Full Review » (12 answers)
Arthur J. Fasciani
4.0
by Arthur J. Fasciani - Oct. 1, 2008

It is difficult to creat prose from so much statistical content and this article is an example of that challenge. The writer relies heavily on numbers with some important analysis interspersed. On a wider level, though, this article - and most stories in this topic - are based on the health industry focus of "cost shifting" and say nothing about the underlying increases in delivering health care. It seems as long as the insurance companies find ways to shift the costs of health care, the health industry will continue to raise their prices of goods and services. I guess I'm moving into the "editorial" area but I believe it is an important discussion that is not being heard.

See Full Review » (6 answers)

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