The Secrets Next Door

In suburbs across the nation, the intelligence community goes about its anonymous business. Its work isn’t seen, but its impact is surely felt.

The government has built a national security and intelligence system so big, so complex and so hard to manage, no one really knows if it's fulfilling its most important purpose: keeping its citizens safe. Part 3 of the Washington Post's Top Secret America investigation. Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu - via Marc Ambinder, Shams Kazi (f), Fred Sampson (f), avivao (f), Alex Williams (f)
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Subjects: World, U.S., Business
Topics: War, U.S. Military, CIA
Member Tags: private spies
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# Diggs: 93 (as of 2010-07-21)
# Tweets: 25 (as of 2010-07-20)
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - Jul 20, 2010 - 10:10 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Jan 14, 2011 - 7:45 AM PST
Jon Mitchell
4.3
by Jon Mitchell - Jul. 21, 2010

Gripping. It's amazing to hear how extensive this "alternative geography" is, and this is just the stuff the Post can report! There's an interesting level of self-consciousness in the reporting here; the article states that there are only two reasons that the existence of these programs comes up for debate from within: either something goes wrong, or something gets leaked to the press. This installment also gets personal with people on the inside, which expanded my personal concept of what American life is like, for sure. The Post's smooth, clean multimedia interface makes reading this story an engrossing experience.

This article explains that, according to the Myers-Briggs personality test, most NSA employees are ISTJs. I'm an ENFP. That's the exact opposite. Guess I'm not cut out for that line of work.

See Full Review » (20 answers)
Dwight Rousu
4.3
by Dwight Rousu - Jul. 21, 2010

The life and habitat of top secret spies is described. If you are not familiar with it, it sounds like another world.

Your tax dollars at work listening to your phone conversations and reading your email.

See Full Review » (12 answers)
Joseph W Kalb
4.0
by Joseph W Kalb - Jul. 21, 2010

we have tons of intellgence and no oversite. This was obvious in the Bush year but hasn't gone away. I believe this is a risk to our democracy and hard fought liberties.

See Full Review » (4 answers)

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