The War We Don't Know

While Russia and America see the conflict in abstract terms about spheres of influence and protecting allies, for Ossetians, who still recall the centuries of massacres Georgians committed against them, it is highly personal. They will still recall the Georgian massacres in the early 1920s, when Georgia was briefly independent, which exterminated up to 8 percent of the Ossetian population. Full Story »

Posted by Kaizar Campwala
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Randy Morrow
3.9
by Randy Morrow - Oct. 1, 2008

Very informative article on issues of the Georgian conflict that are not being covered in Western main stream media.

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Kaizar Campwala
3.9
by Kaizar Campwala - Dec. 29, 2008

Coming from the Nation, there is an expected bias against current US Foreign Policy. However, Ames' point about the Ossetians is valid. Whether his profile of Saahashvili is accurate is another matter. From what I've read, comparing him to Milosevic may not be fair.

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Fred Gatlin
4.0
by Fred Gatlin - Oct. 1, 2008

The more we learn about the history, the more it is gray than white and black.

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Chris Finnie
5.0
by Chris Finnie - Oct. 1, 2008

Interestingly enough, I said the same thing about the way the war was being portrayed just a day or so ago when reviewing another article. This gives a lot more depth to a more complex topic than most media are reporting on.

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Patricia Blochowiak
4.6
by Patricia Blochowiak - Oct. 1, 2008

Newsworthy. Still, it lacks the significant information that Karl Rove visited Georgia only a few weeks ago.

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James Canning
4.9
by James Canning - Oct. 1, 2008

This excellent story brings out background facts that most Americans following the events in Georgia ought to know. The historical background is often something many readers of US newspapers have to do without. I recommend Anatol Lieven's article in the Financial Times for Aug. 14th, "The west shares the blame for Georgia". John McCain wanted Georgia as a member of NATO even though he ought to have been aware of serious ethnic problems that repeatedly threaten civil war and foreign intervention. McCain's gross lack of judgment (and the lack of judgment of his main foreign policy adviser, Rany Scheunemann) is one of the themes of this excellent piece.

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Dwight Rousu
4.8
by Dwight Rousu - Oct. 1, 2008

The article has the potential to restore some perspective and balance in viewing the ruckus in the Caucasus. The degree of totalitarian fascism in the Georgia government is not reflected in US big corporate media. Bush/cheney try to confuse people into thinking that capitalism and democracy are the same thing, into forgetting that Mussolini and Hitler were the pinnacles of capitalism, and the antithesis of democracy. Therefore if Georgia is capitalist, bush/cheney want one to assume it is democratic and humanistic. The Saakashvili military attacks against the civilians of Ossetia seem more like genocide than an incidental event that can be ignored by the press.

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Tom Maertens
4.9
by Tom Maertens - Oct. 1, 2008

You don't always expect high-quality journalism from a writer at an obscure alternative publication in Moscow, like the eXile, but Ames -- and before him, Matt Taibbi -- used that publication as a platform to move on in the world of journalism. This story reflects a deeper understanding of the checkered history between Russia, Georgia and Ossetia than the knee-jerk belligerence of McCain and the Neocons. Most Americans probably couldn't locate Tbilisi on the map, and likely think the Georgian capital is really Atlanta. But that won't stop the Neocons from pushing their aggressive agenda, in Russia and elsewhere.

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