Why I Changed My Mind | The Nation

None of the policies that involve testing and accountability—vouchers and charters, merit pay and closing schools—will give us the quantum improvement that we want for public education. They may even make matters worse. Full Story »

Posted by Chris Finnie
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Posted by: Posted by Chris Finnie - Jun 17, 2010 - 9:22 PM PDT
Reviewed by: Chris Finnie (review)
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Edited by: Chris Finnie - Jun 17, 2010 - 9:24 PM PDT
Chris Finnie
3.9
by Chris Finnie - Jun. 17, 2010

An interesting insiders look at educational policy in the U.S. I had to admire Ravitch's honesty in looking at the result of policies she previously promoted. She supports her switch with commendable scholarship and a wealth of figures.

This article was part of a series on education, presented in the same issue. I have linked several. Taken together, they present a wealth of choices for meaningful reform. Though the recommendations may conflict, none disagree that reform is badly needed. And all were uniformly persuasive on that point.

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