Lost Media, Found Media

Snapshots from the future of writing

To be a Found Media journalist or pundit, one need not be elite, expert, or trained; one must simply produce punchy intellectual property that is in conversation with groups of other citizens. Found Media-ites don't tend to go to editors for approval, but rather to their readers and to their blog community. In many cases, they disdain the old models, particularly newspapers, which they see as having calcified over the decades, and, according to generally ... Full Story »

Posted by Kaizar Campwala

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Review

Tish Grier
2.5
by Tish Grier - Oct. 1, 2008

A stuffy article that suffers from j-school myopia. Alissa Quart's major error in this story is categorizing most "Found Media" creators as young. In my "found media" travels, I've become acquainted with many Found Media creators--a large majority of them are well over 40 (Gordon Joseloff of Westport Now comes to mind, as well as Jon Weber of New West-I could go on...) Further, Quart does not mention the numbers of non-journalists who are creating all sorts of "found media" every day. From history blogs to food blogs to blogs about tax issues in a town, there are many, many forms of "found media" that are solo voices providing that sense of both the personal and the editorial that is lacking from their local newspaper. Many aren't grant winners nor are they hanging out at Nieman lectures. They're busy taking care of the important conversations online at home.

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Tish's Rating

Overall
2.5

Poor
from 13 answers
Quality
2.2
Facts
3.0
Fairness
2.0
Information
2.0
Sourcing
2.0
Style
3.0
Accuracy
2.0
Balance
2.0
Context
2.0
Popularity
3.5
Recommendation
3.0
Credibility
4.0
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