Loan to Kick-start U.S. Solar Thermal Industry

Federal funds could help 15 gigawatts of solar projects move forward.

A massive $1.37 billion loan guarantee that the U.S. Department of Energy granted to Brightsource Energy last week could help clear the way for over 15 gigawatts of solar projects in California, and could be the key to launching a new solar thermal industry in the United States. Full Story »

Posted by Jon Mitchell
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Posted by: Posted by Jon Mitchell - Jun 8, 2010 - 10:34 AM PDT
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Dale Penn - Jun 9, 2010 - 9:59 AM PDT

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Jon Mitchell
3.9
by Jon Mitchell - Jun. 8, 2010

Using the federal loan guarantee to Brightsource Energy as a jumping-off point, this article provides a helpful introduction to solar thermal energy technology, a less familiar way of generating electricity from sunlight than photovoltaic cells.

See Full Review » (10 answers)
Fabrice Florin
3.1
by Fabrice Florin - Jun. 9, 2010

Interesting report about a significant government subsidy to expand solar thermal projects in California. But this article primarily relies on a single source: Brightsource, the loan's beneficiary, with only one short independent citation to put this news in context.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Kaizar Campwala
3.6
by Kaizar Campwala - Jun. 9, 2010

Decent explanation of solar thermal, with an exploration of associated land use issues in California.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Mike LaBonte
3.7
by Mike LaBonte - Jun. 9, 2010

Two sources, and most but not all facts needed to support claims.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Dale Penn
3.8
by Dale Penn - Jun. 9, 2010

Provides insight into political, economic and environmental issues faced by new large scale technology. Sourcing is adequate, but could be stronger.

See Full Review » (6 answers)
Alexander Rose
4.0
by Alexander Rose - Jun. 9, 2010

This is a good story on the challenges of large scale solar thermal. 1.37 billion sounds like a lot until you look at the way the US subsidizes fossil fuel which would be a good figure to include here...

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Joel JD
by Joel JD - Jun. 9, 2010

It would have been a good article. However, since the website is fake or inactive, the fact that I can't add an opinion to thier offered blog, and the fact their website never responded back with a "member creation e-mail," unfortunately the entire site and story must be scrapped in my book. This site is not accredited, and amounts to little more than a blog.

See Full Review » (1 answer)

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