Herbal Supplements Often Have Contaminants, Study finds

Nearly all of the herbal dietary supplements tested in a Congressional investigation contained trace amounts of lead and other contaminants, and some supplement sellers made illegal claims that their products can cure cancer and other diseases, investigators found. Full Story »

Posted by Catherine Duyn - via Patrick LaForge, New York Times (Most Emailed), Slatest, miker1717 (t), Josh_Young (t), Salvador Sala (t), Tobie Openshaw (f), Gian Antelles (f), Randy Benson (f), David Fox (f)
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Subjects: Business, Health
Topics: Wellness
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# Diggs: 4 (as of 2010-05-26)
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Posted by: Posted by Catherine Duyn - May 25, 2010 - 8:55 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Dwight Rousu - May 25, 2010 - 11:36 PM PDT

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Dwight Rousu
3.8
by Dwight Rousu - May. 27, 2010

Heavy metal is getting popular in herbal remedies. Interesting information about supplement production being widely outsourced, and not inspected.

What about pesticide contaminants on ordinary foods? Are they similarly tested? Are organic vegetables safer?

See Full Review » (13 answers)
Sirajul Islam
3.4
by Sirajul Islam - May. 26, 2010

Some valid points raised. I think, more research is necessary, and the scientists community should agree to a point free from the influences of the bureaucracy and industry

See Full Review » (19 answers)
Catherine Duyn
4.3
by Catherine Duyn - May. 27, 2010

This article reaches out to the public because today people are reaching to all sorts of different means to stay healthy. Vitamins and natural supplements are very popular so it is important to know if they actually work. In these cases, they did not. It is important for consumers to know that if a supplement is promising a treatment, cure, or prevention must go through the "strict regulatory review". They do say that few companies are doing this, but that they are trying to "police" them. This with the landmark food safety bill make this article very engaging for the public. I would hope that it does have an effect on attitudes about what is promised by vitamins.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Chinae Gonzales
3.9
by Chinae Gonzales - May. 26, 2010

In this article the author uses tools to grasp fears from it's readers. Playing on the fact that many Americans use dietary supplements, the author connects each reader to the scientific research being done to investigate claims made by drug companies. Moreover, the author looks to the public in reforming standards of medicine and pushing congress and the FDA to hold higher rules for companies that break rules and falsify drug effects.

See Full Review » (19 answers)

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