American Oligarchy

Every time the president accuses Republicans of trying to “block progress” or of defying “common sense,” as he did that night, he is executing a dangerous tightrope walk. His party’s electoral fortunes depend on his making forceful calls for reform of our banking laws. His party’s fundraising fortunes depend on his ensuring that no serious reform—of the kind that endangers the big banks’ size and power—ever happens. Full Story »

Posted by Jon Mitchell - via Real Clear Politics, Digg
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Subjects: U.S., Politics, Business
Member Tags: early morning update
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Posted by: Posted by Jon Mitchell - May 2, 2010 - 10:08 PM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Jon Mitchell - May 4, 2010 - 7:53 AM PDT

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Jon Mitchell
4.0
by Jon Mitchell - May. 4, 2010

I really enjoyed this read, as upsetting as it might be. Caldwell has a very nuanced understanding of the way finance and government intertwine.

See Full Review » (10 answers)
Patricia L'Herrou
3.5
by Patricia L'Herrou - May. 4, 2010

this unsettling opinion is a description of an analysis by the imf's chief economist, simon johnson, of the causes of the financial meltdown. he focuses on how the huge financial institutions essentially have bought the government, particularly democrats. the opinion here doesn't offer any other point of view nor any sources of the parties discussed..

See Full Review » (9 answers)
Chris Finnie
4.0
by Chris Finnie - May. 4, 2010

While Caldwell launches off into unsupported speculation a few times, most of his arguments are well-documented, disturbing, and convincing.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Sirajul Islam
3.9
by Sirajul Islam - May. 4, 2010

Well, a rather good but very lengthy report to make the point 'American Oligarchy.' I can recollect a Telegraph report most probably less than two years before or so wherein they said that the US bailout plan that the US Congress passed only benefit the Wall Street Investment Banks, and some financial contractors, as in the case some military contractors benefited in Iraq War.

See Full Review » (17 answers)

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