Joseph F Dunphy MBA MFP

Founding Member (since May 2006)
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Former financial journalist, MBA corporate finance, board-certified Master Financial Professional. Author several published works on finance.

About Joseph Help
Location: Clifton, New Jersey, United States
Occupation: personal finance, Joseph F Dunphy MBA
Publications: Other, Daily Kos
Interests: military affairs, human rights, radio
Expertise: MBA corporate finance
Affiliations: contribute military news analysis to News Dissector at mediachannel.org
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Address: Clifton, NJ, 07013, US
Last Visit: May 19, 2007 - 4:07 PM PDT
Last Edit: Feb 14, 2007 - 12:18 PM PST

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Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.8

The problem with stories like this is that the real cost of the brutal war, which is fast approaching 1 million victims, is marginalized, by focusing on the price tag only to the US. This is similar to the marketing ploy of emphazing the zer0-percent financing, instead of the safety features of the car that would keep you and your family safe. In effect, it's a ritualized way of desensitizing people to the war. It is almost guaranteed that any photographer taking full color pictures of the human aspect of the war would garner more headline coverage, and more prize potential. People who lived through the Vietnam war predicted that it would be more costly and less easy than the politicians predicted. But the press co-operated and ... More »

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NT Rating: 4.0 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.6

This is an excellent piece. It is informative, well-researched, and clearly presented. It is to Salon's credit that the online magazine published it; as I am not a Salon subscriber, it's hard for me to know if this piece is typical of the quality of the journalism there. But it is noteworthy that the commercial media have not yet made a big enough story about this. Typical TV coverage is limited to the horserace-style issues, i.e. that the scandals may force Attorney General Gonzales and FBI Director Mueller to resign. In the case of the FBI, abuse existed under J.Edgar "Mary" Hoover, and the FBI's record in the JFK and Martin Luther King investigations was light years beyond disgraceful, the continued bleeding ulcer that is the ... More »

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NT Rating: 4.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.0

The focus of the article is more technological than an examination of the issues, which should be the purpose of the paper. Nowhere does the reporter explore the obvious demographic issues, such as why CD's, when senior citizens, who vote, might be reluctant to use the technology. The article does not-amazingly--cover the issues that Iowa considers important, which the rest of the country may not think are so pressing. The war issue is buried. Pedestrian reporting. Focused narrowly on the horserace aspect only.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.2 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.0

On the surface, it appears to be a routine gee-whiz story about political use of social marketing technology that everybody with a high-school or college age child knows about. But it has the virtue of coming early in the election cycle, so that activists supporting a get-out-the-vote effort can make use of the findings. The article neglects two aspects: the amazing apathy among young voters, who seem unaware about the potential impact of a draft on their lives; and total ignorance of the down side of social networking, such as the potential use of personal information to "redline" or block a young adult from voting. Investigations in Washington, D.C., notably by Greg Palast, have already revealed that Republican operatives ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.7

This appears to be a reasonable attempt to explore a controversial topic. As an Irish-American, I kept looking for a reference to the 800 year long conflict between Protestant and Catholic in Northern Ireland. Couldn't find it. So it appeared to me to be another article not grounded in reality. Brought to mind the Biblical saying about being concerned with the mote in one's neighbor's eye, without paying attention to the beam in one's own eye. There is an excellent Oscar Wilde quote to the effect that the world would be very different if Christians actually practised Christianity. Regardless of what is said in the article, world reknown bigot Ian Paisley still holds enormous political power in Ireland and England. To borrow a ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.1

This is the standard poll-story "thumb-sucker" which nevertheless serves the valuable purpose of giving the public a general idea of what a statistically valid cross-section believes on a topic. The topic is certainly valid, and of public interest. What it did not explore is the sub-topic of how a small group of cultists and zealots have shanghaied some of the organs of government and the media to grab earthly power, and impose their religious will on the un-organized majority. Kevin Phillips and others have documented it in great detail; but the lazy newspapers see fit to print homoginized, robotic, "objectivized" coverage instead. Critical thinkers need not apply.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.5 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.8

This is actually an important story, although it's hard to call it a good one. It is standard poll survey results, albeit the Times deserves some credit for taking a critical stance on the absolutely unbelievable perception that--after Katrina dragging on so long--the US is in any position to react to a major disaster--because it's taken so long to respond to the last one. As one example, just because I'm an EMT, my e-mail has seen postings on how FEMA is being criticized because it STILL hasn't developed an efficient system for re-imbursing Doctors and health professionals for the expenses they incur--usually digging deep into their pockets to buy medical supplies for Patients. In effect, doctors, nurses, etc. are bankrolling ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.7

I will confess my bias towards being a fan of Chalmers Johnson, and recommend most of his writing. He is asking questions that many won't. One of the questions that grunts in the military would like to ask is, with so many troops on so many bases, how come the same combat units have to keep going back to the sand box of Iran, or the mountains of Afghanistan, or both, so many times, while the rear echelon in the military itself seems to go on happily, without breaking a sweat. That's the kind of question that comes up in hospitals ...

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NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.1

This actually covers one of the more important questions of this year. Harper's deserves credit for at least running it. It does not provide an answer, because there is not enough hard evidence yet, and people still remember Sy Hersh's story about boots being on the ground in Iran. But even the casual observer by now will recognize the familiar drumbeat of the war drums from the neo-cons. One would suppose a sure sign of war would be a surge in applications for 4-F draft status by the draft-age sons of the neocons.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 4.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.8

This is an absolutely brilliant idea. Therefore, it needs no defense. It stands on its own merits. My only suggestion: Let's not have ex-NJ Gov Tom Kean in charge of the Press Commission. This would immeasurably increase the chances for a valid report. IMO, it should also focus on the deliberate omissions of commercial TV stations, with a view toward removing their TV licences for failure to act in the public interest.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.8 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.6

Actually, I like the story, as it does one of the classic things journalism is supposed to do: afflict the comfortable, and comfort the afflicted. It rightly shows that even a good deed can be undermined by other circumstances. It would be even better if the paper followed up on this, and looked at the decision-making process for building Habitat for Humanity Houses. Until this article, I was unaware that the poor were assuming mortgages on these homes; I was under the impression that the homes were given free. Thus, it seems somebody, probably the banks, seem to be making money from a non-profit enterprise. This looks absolutely ripe for a follow-up series. Donors to Habitat for Humanity may be under the impression that the ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.5 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.2

Veteran investigative reporter Walter Pincus has been short-changed by his own paper for most of the Iraq War II debacle. As investigations progress, Pincus emerges as one of the absolutely accurate, reliable reporters. It is the shame of the Washington Post, and commercial TV, that his voice is not more well known. Actually, one wonders why no one else has offered Pincus a better paying job, or why he stays with such an ungrateful employer. A national treasure, like the Grand Canyon, suffering through the Bush Administration. Pincus deserves a Pulitzer Prize, just as Thomas Friedman deserves to have one taken away.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.5 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.3

This is valuable, as far as it goes, but the reporter should have their knuckles rapped for not doing a modicum of background research so they could put things in perspective. The number show that the Pentagon has been caught in an outright lie--Pentagon press releases previously asserted that the "moral waivers" on criminals etc. would be capped at 2 percent--which would translate into no more than 1,600 recruits a year on 80,000 recruits in total. Yet the reporters numbers, directly from the Pentagon, show that this was violated last year, before the caps were put in place, by 2.5 times--with 5 percent of the force substandard--almost stovepiping the numbers before putting in the 2 percent cap--and still the Pentagon couldn't ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.5

The article is excellent, as far as it goes. It neglects to indicate that vehicles require at least 25 percent maintenance, and so if operations are going round-the-clock, every week the maintenance schedule falls about 42 hours behind! This is an area where mercenary forces would actually be worthwhile, but there is no mention of how they are being employed on the maintenance problem, although certainly some of them are contributing on the aircraft maintenance side. Oddly missing is equally shocking detail that, with 40 percent of resources coming from National Guard and Reserve forces, and those trucks and equipment are being transferred either to active units or to Iraqi units, that means that when Guard and Reserve units ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 4.1 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.9

This is a reasonable portrait of a military man about the walk the gangplank of a failed strategy. One year from now, Petreus may become just as obsure historically as the French General in charge of DienBienPhu.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.7 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.0

Frankly, the use of public opinion polls themselves are in my opinion starting to pose a threat to democracy themselves. The newspapers give them more weight than general elections. Since November 2006, where the public clearly indicated strong sentiment against the war, the tendency of newspapers to focus on stories like these--job approval ratings--undercuts the results of elections. IMO, the public is getting increasingly frustrated with elections that do not yield the results that the public voted for. The poll tells me one thing, statistically, that about one third of the public failed to learn the scientific method in school, as they will support Bush no matter how high the stack of evidence is against him on the ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.4

This is a clean, concise presentation of the top three major issues affecting keeping the internet as free as it is now: FCC rules, net neutrality, and the influence of the major TV and cable companies. It assumes that readers have some knowledge of the subject. It would have been improved by mentioning the issue of media consolidation; and the fact that net neutrality in the current BellSouth merger is "guaranteed" by corporate promises for only two years. The article leaves the impression that there is unlimited time to press forward with new legislation. That is a wrong impression. There are severe time constraints. Readers need to know this--so this omission cost the article some points for incompleteness.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 4.2 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
1.4

Everybody knows that the Administration has cut the Democrats out of the legislative process for the past 6 years. There are even indictments and convictions that prove the point in federal courts. How NPR could even pretend to use the word bi-partisan can only be explained by the fact that it still receives government funding, and the political hacks still at the top of PBS put the ideological squeeze on the organization. Better reporting comes out of Pravda these days. This is really an embarrassment, and deserves to be cudgeled by media critics. Generously cudgeled.

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 1.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.6

It is quite difficult to know what to make of this report. It talks about the Taliban without discussing the Northern Alliance, the group that fought against the Taliban around 2002. It might be a very important piece, gathered at great personal risk; or it might be more dis-information, in the tradition of Judith Miller's murderous red-herring on WMD that did not exist. It is not particularly clear, and the story cries out for a better map than the Times provided. By going to the internet, though, one has to raise questions about this story. According to the reporting, the Taliban are operating openly in the area between Kandahar, Afghanistan, and Quetta, Pakistan. If you look at a relief map, Kandahar is where the desert ends, ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
1.0

This is an extra-ordinarily lazy hit piece on Bernie Sanders. A quick trip to Wikipedia reveals the same headline and angle done a year ago by the London Guardian and in 5-12-2005 by Common Dreams. It also reveals what the Times' hidden agenda might be in approving such a piece of sloth--that Bernie Sanders is a leader in the media reform movement. It's common knowledge that the Times is selling off several TV stations. The Times does not point out Sanders' distinguished record on behalf of the middle class, the environment, unions and civil rights--and it wouldn't hurt the Times to have a civil rights defender in first amendment-related legislation. It significantly omits that Sanders voted against the war, which is now a hot ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.3 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.5

Politics makes strange bedfellows. In their zealousness to attack the Clinton Administration, anticipating that Hillary Clinton will run for president, as indeed she is, the right-wing Weekly Standard takes up the lance with this FOIA story. In the telling, it emerges that this actually took place on Nixon's watch, a Republican, making it absurd to blame anything on Clinton, who of couse ran for president much later. Their emphasis on the classification of the warning note being downgraded from flash to routine betrays an amazing ignorance of radio/communication proceedure. If the intercepts could not better pin down the when and where of the planned attack, its usefulness as intelligence was negligible. Where would you send ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.2 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.0

The headline initially mis-leads the reader into thinking its about a DRAFT. Once you get past this headline butchery, you start to think in terms of oil negotiations. But the story is written in a style so boring, one can barely bring oneself to read it. In addition, no one really believes anything that comes out of the Iraqi government or even the Green Zone overlords. Frankly, by the end of the second paragraph, all I could think of is why this wasn't accomplished in the first month after the end of the invasion. By now, we all know why. The Iraqis are in a civil war, and agree on very few things--including this, most likely. The Iraqi government, the US administrators, and quite frankly The Times--with the exception perhaps ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.1 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.0

This is a really disappointing story. To her credit, Louise Roug does add to our understanding of the young idealist by digging up the love-story angle. But it's disappointing because making that the chief angle seems to have gotten the emphasis totally wrong. Randi Rhodes of Air America Radio, who actually knew her, gave a wonderful on-air tribute to Andi's amazing idealism, and desire to actually do something to make the world better. That should have been the emphasis of the story, as a way for future ages to remember her. Instead, the emphasis on the love story aspect really cheapens her memory--even in the story you can sense that her mission was much larger than her involvement with the male reporter. She genuinely wanted ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.7

This human interest vignette shows a layer of the conflict not often covered. It shows a form of apartheid being carried out. Clearly, there are elements not even remotely interested in living in peace, or respecting human rights. It exposes, by indirection, the contradiction between Arab professed concern for Palestinean rights, and the similar discriminatory treatment being given others, who, after all, are their neighbors. It shows the depth of public sentiment in Iraq. For those who lived through the Vietnam era, these scenes are all too familiar. A good enough story, judgment reserved on the source, as accuracy is undetermined. It should have been noted that Lebanon in a source of refuge because the Malekite Christians are ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.0

If this were a football game, this story would resemble a dramatic, suspense-filled fumble. The "why should I care?" line is in the opposite end zone, right at the bottom. Ie, if the technology succeeds, there is no need for several pollution prone coal-fired power plants. The story is a mish-mosh of technical facts, which obviously an engineer told to a reporter who more or less understood, but couldn't quite manage to make us understand. Halfway through the story, I lost interest. Only scanning the rest to see if there were any nuggets of importance brought me to the zinger at the end that there were absolutely huge savings possible. Apparantly, the reporter did not know enough about the lighting business to ask a major trade ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.8

This is potentially a very important story, given that 250,000 Turkish soldiers are on the border with Iraq, and believed to be ready to settle border disputes with the Kurds in Iraq. But the story stops short of giving the real political significance of the impact on the region. On the plus side, it shows the potential struggle between the Islamist side and the secularists. On the negative side, this is probably oversimplifying the analysis. US readers would benefit from better reporting from Turkey, which a few years ago had one of the fastest growing stock markets in the world. Pepsi has a $100 million investment in Turkey, and a spring break episode has been performed on a nearby island. Disappointly, the story does little ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.7

This story covers a vital first-amendment and fourth-amendment issue. First, Kudos for covering it in a serious way. Second, the really chilling part, sort of buried in the story, is that it is obvious that the police overstepped their bounds by classifying people who "might disrupt" the event as being in the same class as actual death-threat candidates. The police chief should be fired, to make an example of him. The article does not go into the broader trend, evidenced in NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg's imposition of open air cages dubbed, in elegant oxymoronic terms, "free speech zones." This creeping extension of executive privilidge, from the President, to governors, to lowly mayors, like other forms of corruption, will ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.8 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
1.9

It is really difficult to know what to make of this story. The only source is the US Government, and no scientific evidence is offered, probably to protect sources and methods. Reporter Bill Broad is one of the Time's premier science reporters, but one has to bear in mind that there has been a scandal about the Time's scientific coverage of the A-Bomb in WWII, plus the scandal involving Judith Miller's completely false reporting on WMD. The ability of a scientist to calculate the estimated damage does not mean confirmation of destruction of the weather satellite. We are by now wary of the Pentagon's use of media as part of their cyber-war strategy, and the political timing of invoking China as a potential weapons threat just as ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.4

It is amusing to watch "armchair general" Krauthammer opine against the strategy recommendations of the Pentagon's designated hitter in the Iraq mess, Gen. Petraeus. However, Krauthammer does make a point that the Iraqi government is a thin reed on which to rest hopes for success of a surge strategy. However, both Krauthammer's and Petraeus's analysis seem to shortchange the corrosive role of corruption in the whole process. Unemployment is rampant, well above the 30 percent that taxed US political institutions in the Great Depression, and that alone is enough pressure to undermine any government. Add corruption to that, and there are several actors in the area with bags of cash, and you have a real rat's nest. Krauthammer ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.9

This is nearly straight stenography, and is typical of the one-source story style of reporting that is infecting stories of this type. But this is the sort of thing that is also cited to impress potential advertisers of the value of advertising on TV at such events. A simple comparison will show the dangers of doing so. I will compare these numbers in the Gallup poll of football being popular, but under 50 percent of those surveyed. By comparison, a paper by US Sports Academy, by Soonhwa Lee et al, looked at the calculated economic value of what is actually paid for the rights to sports on TV. They calculated for footbale, basketball, baseball and hockey. Pro football garnered 53.5 percent of total revenues, basketball about 28 ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.3 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.5

This is an amazingly casual handling of a story that affects a rather large group of people. The New York Times, which considers itself to be a national newspaper and even a heavily international newspaper, should know that there are about 60 million Catholics in the US, and that the Archbishop of New York has been considered to be a candidate for Pope. Moreover, even their advertising department uses demographics, yet the reporter could not get the space to put in an illustration of what the changes would mean. Even commercial TV, which normally does a horrid job of covering the news, at least made mention that the closings come in the inner city, while outlying suburbs are expanding, so that there is actually a net increase--a ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.8 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
1.6

This is an excellent example of how commercial media (let's count the oil spots as commercials, shall we?) applies massive doses of novacaine to the real story, turning a truly exciting turn of events into something that appears boring. First, let's not forget the institutional bias of NPR, where the Republicans implanted an ideologue at the top of their food chain. This piece reflects the right leaning bias. First, the story does not answer the question what--what the actual reforms were, so let's deduct 20 percent off the rating right there. The piece assumes that the viewer/reader knows the legislation. Second, the quotes are mainly reaction pieces. Fine, but much lower, after substance, would be better. Third: the lead is ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.2 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.3

This is not journalism, per se, but an opinion piece by experts. I am not qualified to comment on the accuracy of their analysis; but in the process they do not mention other explanations that would account for the behavior. After all, royalty in Europe showed signs of all sorts of irrational behavior, some of it partly explained by inter-marrying. Another explanation has been "fetal alcohol syndrome." It would be more convincing if they cited Bush's medical records, which are supposed to be public, but I do not recall Bush releasing his. The analysis, if correct, raises some interesting questions about the responsibility of the physicians for the president and vice president: if they keep something secret, it may preserve the ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 4.1 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
4.1

This is a straight journalistic interview of a person who holds a great deal of "position power" by virtue of the fact that he is now in charge of CBS news, home of Edward R. Murrow, Eric Savereid, Fred Friendly, Dan Rather, etc. By simple questions, the president, supposedly graduating from an ivy league college with high honors, reveals himself to be amazingly shallow and completely ignorant of the responsibility for the news. Basically, we are listening to a jock-sniffing programmer, not an executive of the substance of, say Fred Friendly. It becomes clear that when he blow drys his hair, he is also clearing the inside of a very empty cranium. God help CBS, because this empty suit surely won't. Cast in point: he was ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 4.0 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.8

This is an important story, which should actually have received more air play by commercial TV, which also subscribes to AP. When you couple the investigation with the apparant expansionist moves being made by China against Taiwan, Kerry's investigation takes on even more importance. Unaddressed by the news item is further digging into the story. GAO, even in its watered-down version of being a watchdog, spends plenty of time on all sorts of investigations--if this one was a barn-burner, word would have leaked out previously. Instead of rushing into print with this boilerplate stuff, the reporter would have done well to go back to some of the agencies named by GAO, and gotten some real reaction. What the hell could these ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.7 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.3

This is actually very important journalism, if only because it publicizes the concerns of the very people who are paying the heaviest price for the war in Iraq--the soldiers and the families. Full disclosure: I had served with the Army, and know some of the servicepeople personally. That said, the article does not explore some of the obvious questions of what this means. Rumsfeld just was fired, and Gates has full responsibility for the Pentagon, even though he is travelling overseas (I believe Gates was in Saudi Arabia the day this broke). ALL officers, from the highest to the lowest, know their responsibilities in leading the troops. One has to suspect that what happened here was that some quick decisions were made, and put ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.3

This story doesn't even bother to mention whether the ex-ambassador even speaks any Iraqi langage. There is no mention of a base of support in Iraq for his views. This is neo-colonialist, top-down, power-elite based coverage. What the average reader takes away from this is that the Bush Administration is consistently listening to the wrong people. And now that the Administration is listening to him, might that not also be an indicator that his solutions are out-of-date? The article does not mention the one obvious possiblity: turning it over to the Iraqis, with the US merely assisting with technical support. Oddly, that seems to be the position favored by Iraqis and the US public. What the article confirms is that the ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.7 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
3.0

This is pretty standard AP fare, alerting people to a problem in the world, without much analysis. The obvious question for American readers is will it require any support from the US military, already stretched thin from Iraq and Afghanistan? And it is answered indirectly by explaining that the aim is to limit the military role to UN peacekeepers, largely supplied by African countries. AP obligingly does not mention whether the US is currently paid up on its UN dues, which would help provide some funds for peacekeepers. AP neglects to mention that UN peacekeeping duty has become extremely hazardous, especially after Bosnia, so that fewer countries are willing to participate. And AP does not mention the scandals where UN ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 2.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.6

The article seems fine at first glance, but upon analysis it reveals its true conservative bias. The biggest red-flag for the average reader is that the source of the story is the Annenberg Foundation, and the late Walter Annenberg was one of the co-founders of Reader's Digest, which goes to some 50 million plus homes in America, making his media reach truly part of an empire. Annenberg was a supporter of Republican politics in California, so a friend and financial supporter of Nixon, etc. So we are at least alert that this is sourced from a right-wing funded think tank. As to the actual piece itself, the focus on the president's factual accuracy is fair game, but then they actually stop short of analyzing what the real facts ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.7 | See All NT Reviews »
Joseph reviewed this story - Oct 1, 2008
Joseph's Rating
2.6

This is a truly important topic, inartfully told. The union group has a point, that there are economic inequalities built into the system--but then fails to explain that a recent survey showed that some 60 percent of Americans would support legislation to allow them to join a union. Why this in not mentioned is a mystery--unless you factor in that the reporter may not be very familiar with the history of the union movement. The article does not explain how important black and Latino votes were to Democrats as swing votes that actually got candidates elected. Curiously, it doesn't really show how the minimum wage would help---and there are all kinds of numbers available in DC for reference. The reporter has a truly important ... More »

See Full Review » (7 answers)
NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
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